Posts (134)

3 days ago · Community Health Workers in Hawai'i: A Scoping Review and Framework Analysis of Existing Evidence

Abstract Introduction: Community health workers (CHWs) play a vital role in health across Hawai‘i, but the scope of this work is not comprehensively collated. This scoping review describes the existing evidence of the roles and responsibilities of CHWs in Hawai‘i. Methods: Between May and October 2018, researchers gathered documents (eg, reports, journal articles) relevant to Hawai‘i CHWs from health organizations, government entities, colleges/universities, and CHWs. Documents were reviewed for overall focus and content, then analyzed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 10 Essential Public Health Services as well as the Community Health Worker Core Consensus Project roles to identify workplace roles and gaps. Results: Of 92 documents received, 68 were included for review. The oldest document dated to 1995. Document types included curricula outlines, unpublished reports, and peer-reviewed articles. Documents discussed trainings, certification programs, CHWs’ roles in interventions, and community-, clinical-, and/or patient-level outcomes. Cultural concordance parity between CHWs and patients, cost savings, and barriers to CHW work were noted. Most roles named by the Community Health Worker Core Consensus Project were mentioned in documents, but few were related to the roles of “community/policy advocacy” and “participation in research and evaluation.” Workplace roles, as determined using the 10 Essential Public Health Services, focused more on “assuring workforce competency” and “evaluation,” and less on “policy development,” and “enforcing laws.” Discussion: CHWs are an important part of Hawaii’s health system and engage in many public health functions. Although CHW roles in Hawai‘i mirrored those identified by the CHW Core Consensus Project and 10 Essential Public Health Services frameworks, there is a noticeable gap in Hawai‘i CHW professional participation in research, evaluation, and community advocacy

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Fri, Jun 28 11:59am · Associations with the Receipt of Colon Cancer Screening Among a Diverse Sample of Arab Americans in NYC.

Arab Americans (AA) face increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the US, due to low utilization of preventative care and socioeconomic disparities. This study explores associations with the receipt of CRC screening among AA in New York City. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 individuals attending religious and community organizations with interviewer-administered surveys in Arabic and English. Results from 100 participants showed they were more likely to complete CRC screening with a doctor recommendation (74%) and were more likely to get a recommendation with a high school education or higher (86%). Uninsured participants and those with public insurance were the least likely to complete screening. Those with a higher mean score in Spiritual Life/Faith (13.34 vs. 11.67) were less likely to complete screening. Findings suggest the need for culturally sensitive interventions to increase CRC screening rates among AA.

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Fri, Jun 14 4:11pm · The role of community health workers in cervical cancer screening in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic scoping review of the literature

Abstract

Introduction

Community-based screening for cervical cancer and task sharing to community health workers (CHWs) have been suggested as a potential way to increase screening coverage in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aims of the scoping review were to understand the following: (i) where and how CHWs are currently deployed in screening in LMIC settings; (ii) the methods used to train and support CHWs in screening, and (iii) The evidence on the cost-effectiveness of using CHWs to assist in screening

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Fri, May 31 4:11pm · Social Media Use for Professional Purposes in the Neurosurgical Community: A Multi-Institutional Study

Abstract INTRODUCTION: Since Facebook’s debut in 2004, social media (SoMe) has garnered increased popularity and usage worldwide. Given its appeal and visibility, many industries have utilized SoMe to promote products for professional purposes. Specialized sites have subsequently been created to connect users in similar disciplines. While SoMe sites have amassed over 1-billion followers, SoMe usage in the neurosurgical community has not yet been well described.

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Fri, May 17 11:34am · Social Media Engagement and the Critical Care Medicine Community

Abstract

Over the last decade, social media has transformed how we communicate in the medical community. Microblogging through platforms such as Twitter has made social media a vehicle for succinct, targeted, and innovative dissemination of content in critical care medicine. Common uses of social media in medicine include dissemination of information, knowledge acquisition, professional networking, and patient advocacy. Social media engagement at conferences represents all of these categories and is often the first time health-care providers are introduced to Twitter. Most of the major critical care medicine conferences, journals, and societies leverage social media for education, research, and advocacy, and social media users can tailor the inflow of content based on their own interests. From these interactions, networks and communities are built within critical care medicine and beyond, overcoming the barriers of physical proximity. In this review, we summarize the history and current status of health-care social media as it relates to critical care medicine and provide a primer for those new to health-care social media with a focus on Twitter, one of the most popular microblogging platforms.

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Fri, May 17 11:28am · The Radiology Twitterverse: A Starter's Guide to Utilization and Success

Abstract The rise of social media use in medicine has changed how health care organizations and providers communicate with patients and interact with other members of the medical community. Active social media engagement has been associated with improvements in patient outreach, peer-to-peer interactions, and medical education. In radiology, however, social media is predominantly used among trainees, with significantly lower rates seen in attending physicians who have been in practice for greater than 15 years. Twitter (Twitter.com, San Francisco, California), along with other social media platforms, puts a face to radiology, helping both patients and other health care professionals understand contributions of radiologists to patient care, research, education, and public health. We aim to provide a starter’s guide for radiologists unfamiliar with Twitter (1) to highlight benefits of active Twitter involvement and (2) to remove perceived barriers to active Twitter use.

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Fri, Apr 26 11:22am · Implementation and evaluation of a biotechnology research experience for African-American high school students

Abstract Exposure to science content and development of excitement for scientific inquiry throughout the high school years are imperative in attracting students into the sciences. The purpose of this article is to report lessons learned and share best practices from the implementation and evaluation of a high school STEM program that aims to provide an authentic research experience for African-American students and expose them to the possibility and benefits of attaining advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields. Participants reported that enriching science experiences improved their college readiness and exposed them to STEM degree and career options. Formative evaluation results lead to the following lessons learned for best practice: 1) Relationships with high schools will facilitate buy-in; 2) Setting clear expectations and assigning responsibilities is essential; 3) Diversity and cultural sensitivity training is necessary; and 4) Programs of this nature need strong evaluation.

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Fri, Apr 26 11:19am · Working on Womanhood (WOW): A participatory formative evaluation of a community-developed intervention

Abstract The well-documented disparities in availability, accessibility, and quality of behavioral health services suggest the need for innovative programs to address the needs of ethnic minority youth. The current study aimed to conduct a participatory, formative evaluation of “Working on Womanhood” (WOW), a community-developed, multifaceted, school-based intervention serving primarily ethnic minority girls living in underserved urban communities. Specifically, the current study aimed to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial promise of WOW using community-based participatory research (CBPR) and represented the third phase of a community-academic partnership.

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